The Compassion and the Passion

A merciless master

My suffering prolonged

O sin, you would have me

Alone, without song

My saviour, the servant

Compassion’s concern

Would pursue all my rescue

E’en while I yet spurned

With glory obscured

Power hidden, en-veiled

He served us, his humans

Then the mountain he scaled

Raised to be lowered

Shame brought release

For my sin-burdened soul

To find its long-lasting peace

In your death…

The inherited cycle is broke

Sin’s hold cannot keep me

Your new life brings me hope

Life-blood’s passed on

From parent to child

In your blood shed abroad

I’m no longer beguiled

Sin’s great deception?

That I’m still compelled

To do all its bidding

That I’m under its spell

But my Jesus, you triumphed

In freedom, empowered

A spirit-led choice

To walk the life I’m endowed

With bended knee’s adoration

In restored humanity, stand

Before the depth of your feeling

Poured over me, by your hand

19/4/2019

The Heart’s Gift

A heart’s great gift

Is to be known

So hold it care…

…fully, if shown

Heart’s placed on sleeves

Can bump and bruise

So hold with care…

…ful strokes of truth

The truest heart

In love responds

With gifts of know…

…ing and of song

For heat’s in tune

Their song will sing

A lyric note…

…what e’er the din

26/2/2019

Father’s Day 2017

A father gives life…

perhaps biologically, through forgiveness, by welcome acceptance, with love beyond reason

A father tunes in to a person…

similar, different, unique, valuable

A father recognises…

passions, fears, dreams, realities, potential, capacity

A father teaches…

The 3 R’s, repentance, responsibility, shoe laces, no training wheels, boundaries, honesty

A father models…

excellence, reliability, growth, consistency, faithfulness, sacrifice, generosity, trust, respect, integrity

A father needs…

his children, his grandchildren – those from himself, and those who came (or were brought) to himself

A father loves…

 


 

My father has been all of these things. Some done well; others falteringly; still others because of the nature of his relationship with my mother; there were those that stemmed from his design or own experience; and some of the most precious were those he learned, both deliberately and incidentally.

One of the greatest gifts in my life has been my father. But I’m luckier than most as my dad was also father and grandfather to others beside myself, and those I call mine.

Dad taught me to install a new gearbox and mix concrete by hand (though these were so long ago, I’m up for re-learning). I know how to use a shovel, spade and crow bar (including standing it in the ground so it doesn’t get too hot to hold in the Australian sun). With my dad, I have raised sheds (many a family bonding/dividing occurred during shed-raising), erected swimming pools and dug sewer trenches.

Dad taught me to fill in forms correctly, complete my own tax return, save money, and give it generously. I learned to drive with my dad beside me (and not to wreck his tires on rough edges!). I learned how to check my oil and water (even though I blew up an engine twice), and change a tyre – on EVERY car. I built airplanes, and drank beer from shot glasses in my dad’s shed.

I learned to search out information, truth and lies for myself – and what to do if I needed to find outside assistance. I learned I can surrender to and challenge authority when necessary, and that I will be recognised (and even heeded) when I do so.

I learned that even the unhealthiest of my choices will be respected, and I will always be welcome – even when I have rejected, betrayed and taken my dad’s love for granted. I learned that love has boundaries to protect it, and those that love has brought together.

I’ve watched my dad father those who were not of his own, but were his own just the same.

He has held their children, showed them how to grow to be men, walked them to their waiting life partner, comforted them while they waited for hospital care, helped them uncover some value in life when they could see none, showed them what a loving family looks like, given them a home, presented their funeral farewell, challenged their darkness, led them to light.

I don’t know who will read this, but for many of you he shared his food, gave up his sleep, shared his food, gave his time, shared his food, laughed with you, shared his food, provided his home, shared his food. Did I mention that he shared his food?

My father’s not perfect, but he has been perfectly wonderful for me. And I am exceptionally grateful.

 

I love you Dad!

Love Your Neighbour As Yourself

I have been pondering a thought about ‘loving one’s neighbour as one’s self’.

Jesus said that if the Supreme Authoritative Deity is our own, we hold to Him, then He would be so much to us; completeness; our whole heart, soul and mind. He said that subsequent to that, we would in a similar manner view others as we do ourselves.

My thought is this:

Do we usually presume to have a similar whole, complete fondness for ourselves and are therefore being forced to feel the same way toward those within our spheres…

…or is it just a fact that we will ‘love’ others as we love ourselves (or not love ourselves, as the case may be)?

Is it a natural progression that if I am ashamed of myself, I will subsequently shame others?

If I loathe myself, I will subsequently loathe others?

If I hate myself, I will subsequently hate others?

If I don’t forgive myself, I will subsequently be unforgiving toward others?

If I pass judgement on myself, I will subsequently be judgemental of others?

Etcetera.

Further to this:

If my relationship to the Supreme Authoritative Deity of merciful justice, loving compassion and sacrificial provision is not one of love in wholeness, will my relationship with others be likewise – without love in wholeness?

I will endeavour to love my Designer, Creator and Restorer as He loves me. I will likewise endeavour to love myself as He loves me. I believe I will more naturally love you, similarly, as a result.

Please accept this as my love commitment to us.